Best TIG Welding Gloves 2019 – Reviews & Top Picks

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a pair of TIG leather welding gloves

Anyone who’s tried to TIG weld with gloves that aren’t designed for TIG welding either learns they need different gloves or wonders why they struggle to run a tidy weld.

Our list of reviews reveals the top eight gloves available online for TIG welding, and we explain in our buyer’s guide section what to look for and be wary of in your hunt for the best gloves. We hope you find what you need, and we appreciate you reading our post.

Click here to see our Favorite MIG/STICK Welding gloves.

WeldingChamps’ Top Picks

ModelPriceEditor Rating
Lincoln Leather TIG Welding Gloves
Lincoln Electric Grain Leather TIG Welding Gloves | High Dexterity(Best Overall)

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4.7/5
Superior Precision Arc Leather Welding Gloves
Superior 370GFKL Precision Arc Goatskin Leather Welding Gloves with Kevlar Lining, TIG Welding Gloves

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4.5/5
Caiman Long Cuff Gloves
Caiman White Goatskin, Long Cuff, Welding-Tig(Best Value)

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4.4/5
Tillman Goatskin TIG Welding Gloves
Tillman 1338 Top Grain Goatskin TIG Welding Gloves with 4" Cuff

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4.2/5
Steiner Ironflex TIG Gloves
Steiner 0262-L SPS Ironflex TIG Gloves, Black Premium Grain Kidskin, Brown Reversed Grain Kidskin Back, Adjustable

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3.9/5

8 Best TIG Welding Gloves – Reviews

1. Lincoln Grain Leather TIG Welding Gloves – Best Overall

Lincoln Electric Grain Leather TIG Welding Gloves | High Dexterity

Lincoln Electric’s Grain Leather TIG Welding Gloves are highly dexterous with no internal lining. The three-part Kevlar sewn fingers ensure you feel every detail of the TIG torch movement, filler wire, and your project.

They’re cut-proof to keep your hands safe from the sharp metal you’re welding, and have extra thumb patches to prevent wear while giving additional protection. The long cuff span goes four inches past your hands to avoid burning your forearms if you lean on the hot metal you’re welding.

They’re stained easily if you’re working with steel, but with stainless and clean TIG welding, you won’t have much of a problem with this. They’re also not designed to touch hot metal for long periods, but this ensures you have a sensitive grasp during the welding process while still protecting your hands.

Pros
  • Cuff length: four inches
  • External material: grain leather
  • No internal lining
  • Kevlar stitching
  • Highly dexterous
  • Three-part sewn fingers
  • Extra thumb patch to prevent wear
  • Surrounding heat-resistant
  • Cut-proof
Cons
  • Easy to dirty
  • Not direct-touch heat resistant

2. Endura Goatskin Leather TIG-Welding Gloves

Superior 370GFKL Precision Arc Goatskin Leather Welding Gloves with Kevlar Lining, TIG Welding Gloves

Superior’s top-quality 370GFKL Precision Arc gloves are one of the only sets available that can touch hot steel for a significant length of time without burning you, while still being nimble enough to TIG weld successfully.

They’re not the most comfortable gloves to use, but they do provide enough feel and movement to feed well and maneuver your torch accurately. They have long cowhide cuffs for extra safety protection and are cut-proof, which makes them ideal for handling stainless sheet metal.

They’re quality gloves, and we recommend them in our runner-up spot for welders wanting a little more heat protection than most TIG gloves offer.

Pros
  • Good cuff length
  • External material: goatskin leather
  • Kevlar internal lining
  • Kevlar stitching
  • Cowhide cuffs
  • Cut-proof
  • Surrounding and direct-touch heat-resistant
Cons
  • Moderately dexterous
  • Easy to dirty

3. Caiman Goatskin TIG Welding Glove – Best Value

Caiman White Goatskin, Long Cuff, Welding-Tig

The Caiman White Goatskin TIG gloves are an excellent choice for anyone on a low budget, as they’re incredibly affordable and maintain Caiman’s high standard for supreme craftsmanship. They’re made of goat grain leather and have no internal lining, which makes them touch-sensitive like Lincoln’s highly dexterous pair.

They also have long split leather cuffs, which provide ample heat protection where it’s easy to get burnt but don’t need a sensitive touch like your hands. They’re easily stained and also don’t offer direct-touch protection for heat around your hands, but they will protect you well if you use them correctly.

Pros
  • Cuff length: four inches
  • External material: goat grain leather
  • No internal lining
  • Highly dexterous
  • Long split leather cuffs
  • Cut-proof
  • Surrounding heat-resistant
Cons
  • Not direct-touch heat-resistant
  • Easy to dirty

4. Tillman Top Grain Gloves for TIG Welding

Tillman 1338 Top Grain Goatskin TIG Welding Gloves with 4" Cuff

We like the Tillman 1338 gloves as they have an excellent feel everywhere you need them for your TIG welding procedures. They include additional support where you are easily burned or in places excessive wear occurs.

They have a snug shape and a simple, practical design that does the job. These gloves are not direct-touch heat-resistant, but they give sufficient surrounding heat resistance for low and high amp TIG welding. The Kevlar stitching makes them a durable option that won’t tear at the seams easily.

We recommend these gloves to anyone wanting a low-priced glove that will last a reasonable time and provide sensitive touch to both your fingers and your palm.

Pros
  • Cuff length: four inches
  • External material: top-grain goatskin
  • No internal lining
  • Highly dexterous
  • Kevlar stitching
  • Long split leather cuffs
  • Reinforced thumb patch
  • Surrounding heat-resistant
Cons
  • Not direct-touch heat-resistant
  • Easy to dirty

5. Steiner Ironflex TIG Welding Glove

Steiner 0262-L SPS Ironflex TIG Gloves, Black Premium Grain Kidskin, Brown Reversed Grain Kidskin Back, Adjustable

Steiner is known for producing quality welding gloves, and the Ironflex TIG Gloves are no exception. They’re one of the few pairs available in a black and brown color that are resistant to stains.

They’re a highly dexterous pair of gloves with reversed grain kidskin leather and Kevlar stitching for strength and heat resistance. They also have poly-lined kidskin backs for a comfortable feel and extra heat resistance.

These are our favorite-looking gloves, but the short cuffs make them slightly less safe than other pairs by not keeping your forearms safe. They do, however, have longer cuffs than most of the short cuff range series, and large adjustment straps that make them able to tighten well.

Pros
  • External material: reversed grain kidskin
  • Kevlar stitching
  • Highly dexterous
  • Poly-lined backs
  • Surrounding heat-resistant
  • Don’t stain
  • Seamless fingers
Cons
  • Short cuffs
  • Not direct-touch heat-resistant

6. IRONCAT TIG Welder’s Glove

West Chester IRONCAT 6141 Premium Top Grain Kidskin Leather TIG Welding Gloves

West Chester’s IRONCAT TIG gloves are a good option compared to many available online, but these are our least favorite long-cuffed TIG gloves among our eight reviews. They’re very nimble but have an unusually shaped fit that isn’t as comfortable as other gloves.

The material around the hand is top-grain kidskin leather, and it’s stitched with Kevlar, which makes the gloves last reasonably well. However, their overall quality isn’t to the same standard as other available pairs.

If you want a low-priced pair of TIG gloves and won’t be doing extensive welding, these will serve you well. Otherwise, Caiman’s white TIG gloves sit at the same price range and are much better quality.

Pros
  • Long cuffs
  • External material: top-grain kidskin
  • No internal lining
  • Highly dexterous
  • Kevlar stitching
  • Surrounding heat-resistant
Cons
  • Not direct-touch heat-resistant
  • Not a snug-fitting shape
  • Easy to dirty

7. Revco T50 Tigster TIG-Welding Gloves

Revco T50 LG Tigster Tig Welding Gloves

The Revco T50 LG Tigster gloves are reasonable quality. Their design includes some useful features, like drag patch reinforcement, which enables your hands to slide across the metal in a repeated smooth manner without excessive wear.

They also have a keystone thumb feature that allows excellent movement of your thumbs, adding to their overall dexterous feel. However, the gloves lack the same heat protection other TIG gloves have. There is an inner lining, but it doesn’t help resist the heat like other pure leather gloves with no inner lining do.

They’re not bad for beginner TIG gloves, but we wouldn’t recommend them for extensive use.

Pros
  • External material: goatskin/flameproof cotton
  • Kevlar stitching
  • Drag patch reinforcement
  • Ergonomic keystone thumb
  • Highly dexterous
  • Surrounding heat resistance
Cons
  • Not direct-touch heat-resistant
  • Short cuffs
  • Cotton makes them less heat-resistant
  • Easy to dirty

8. Endura Goatskin Leather Welding Work Gloves

Superior Goatskin Leather Work Gloves – Kevlar Lined Cut Resistant, Arc Flash Safety Work Gloves (Endura-378GKTFG)

The Superior Goatskin Leather Work Gloves are our last choice out of the eight on our list. As the company name suggests, they do a superior job at protecting your hands. They don’t entirely give the capability to touch hot metal, but they do a better job of protecting you from burnt hands than most TIG gloves.

They’re also strong in withstanding cuts with the Kevlar and goatskin duo lining sewn with Kevlar stitching, but the extra material makes them much less dexterous than most TIG welders would like.

You can TIG weld in them, but with a minimal feel. They also have short cuffs with no tightening strap, making them unsuitable for protecting your wrists and forearms. If you don’t need gloves that allow a sensitive feel while welding and want more hand protection, we recommend these gloves. Otherwise, the Superior 370GFKL gloves are better overall and include forearm protection.

Pros
  • External material: goatskin leather
  • Kevlar stitching
  • Kevlar internal lining
  • Cut-proof
  • Surrounding heat-resistant
Cons
  • Not direct-touch heat-resistant
  • Short cuffs
  • Medium dexterous
  • Easy to dirty

Buyer’s Guide

TIG welding gloves are different from MIG welding gloves in many ways, but they serve the same purpose in shielding your hands while providing the ability to handle welding objects.
The following list points out the main areas to consider when buying TIG gloves.

Heat protection

The ability for TIG gloves to withstand heat is not as crucial as a beginner welder would think. They need to protect you from arc rays and welding temperatures, but sensitive touch is a vital element for these gloves, which makes heat protection less achievable.

Some gloves shield better than others, and cheap quality gloves won’t withstand the heat enough to last long or protect your hands. Gloves with the ability to withstand heat while giving ample feel and movement are what you should look for, and this usually comes at a higher price.

Durability

TIG gloves generally don’t last as long as MIG gloves, as they need to be thin, but there is a difference in durability between high- and poor-quality gloves. Gloves with extra pads in places that don’t affect the excellent feel of the gloves and thin structure will last longer.

The type of stitching gloves have makes a difference in their durability too. If there are seams that you’re frequently rubbing metal against, they will wear out and break easily. Seamless fingers are an excellent option to prevent this. Kevlar stitching is superior to other types of seams, and you want the overall manufacturing process to be thorough, not a quick sewing together of some materials.

This quality will make a difference. It will cost slightly more, but the gloves will last longer and ultimately save you money.

Dexterous feel

The word “dexterous” is a common welding term meaning that the gloves provide a sensitive touch with unrestrained movements. You want TIG gloves to feel like they aren’t on you while still protecting your hands.

This is the difference between average TIG gloves and those at the top of the range. The dexterous level shouldn’t compromise the gloves’ protection, but TIG gloves should have a fine balance of both a sensitive free feel and safety.

Coverage

The coverage of your gloves is crucial for protecting yourself from burns, but it also depends on what you’re doing. Some TIG welders like shorter gloves with straps to keep them tight. These have minimal coverage, but those who wear them are generally confident welders who aren’t at risk of burning their arms because of their skill and sometimes the type of welding they’re doing.

Unless this is the case for you, get gloves that provide around four inches of cuff protection to ensure you don’t burn your forearms when welding. They’re slightly less nimble to wear, but do an excellent job at shielding and are designed for both beginner and advanced welders.

Conclusion

Our top pick for welding gloves are the Lincoln Electric Grain Leather TIG Welding Gloves. They’re highly dexterous yet excellent at shielding, and strategically include protective patches to ensure they’re durable.

The best gloves for your money are the Caiman White Goatskin, Long Cuff, Welding-Tig gloves, with a low price range that doesn’t compromise their quality.

We appreciate you reading our list of reviews and hope it’s been helpful. Feel free to leave us comments below.

You should also consider reading our welding cap and passive welding helmet reviews.

Jacob Mills
 

Jacob's an experienced fitter and tuner/welder who's passionate about helping others develop in life through new skills and opportunities. He's found writing on numerous sites like weldingchamps.com about his passions including his website tinyhomeskingdom.com

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